Silverlight & Cross-Domain Policy

3 12 2009

If you are creating a Silverlight application that makes calls to a web service – either WCF or standard ASP.NET based then you will more than likely need an xml ‘policy’ file that allows cross domain access.

In my case I was calling one of the SharePoint inbuilt web services – lists.asmx from my silverlight application. When I tried to debug the application I received the following error –

An error occurred while trying to make a request to URI ‘http://localhost/sites/mysite/_vti_bin/lists.asmx’. This could be due to attempting to access a service in a cross-domain way without a proper cross-domain policy in place.

To fix this problem you need to create an xml file called ‘clientaccesspolicy.xml’ with the following content –

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<access-policy>
    <cross-domain-access>
        <policy>
            <allow-from http-request-headers="*">
                <domain uri="*" />
            </allow-from>
            <grant-to>
                <resource path="/" include-subpaths="true"/>
            </grant-to>
        </policy>
    </cross-domain-access>
</access-policy>

This xml file should be placed in the IIS virtual directory where your web service is located. In my case the SharePoint site collection that contained the web service was inside the IIS default website so I put the xml file in ‘C:\Inetpub\wwwroot’.

Once you have created this xml file make sure you do an IISRESET. Your silverlight application should now be calling the web service correctly and not throwing the above exception.

Hope this helps 🙂

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Getting started with the Bing Maps Silverlight SDK

16 11 2009

I got the chance this morning to have a look at the newly released Bing Maps Silverlight SDK. The bing maps SDK allows you to add a map to your silverlight application and enhance it by adding pushpins, images, videos, shapes and scalable elements etc.

I’m impressed at how easy it is to get a bing map displaying in your silverlight application and start customising it.

I decided to create this getting started guide to help you create a simple silverlight application displaying a bing map.

When you have completed the guide below you should have a map similar to the one below.

image

1. Download and install the Bing Maps Silverlight Control SDK from here –

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=beb29d27-6f0c-494f-b028-1e0e3187e830

2. Create a new ‘Silverlight Application’ project in Visual Studio 2008/2010 whichever you prefer. When the box pops up to asking whether or not you want VS to host the silverlight app in a new web site – make sure its ticked.

3. Add a reference to the dll’s

Microsoft.Maps.MapControl.dll

Microsoft.Maps.MapControl.Common.dll

you can find these dll’s in a subfolder of the installation directory called ‘Libraries’.

4. Create an account at the ‘Bing Maps Account Center’ and create a new application key (you will need this key to be able to use the bing map control) –

https://www.bingmapsportal.com/

4. Open the MainPage.xaml file of your project (not the web project) and a new xml namespace:

xmlns:m=”clr-namespace:Microsoft.Maps.MapControl;assembly=Microsoft.Maps.MapControl”

5. Next add the following code inside the Grid control (make sure you paste your bing maps application key into the CredentialsProvider property –

<m:Map
Height=”300″
Width=”350″
x:Name=”testMap”
CredentialsProvider=”Your application key goes here
Background=”White”
Mode=”Road”
Center=”19.642588,50.273438″
ZoomLevel=”0″>
<m:Pushpin Location=”52.97421339369046,-1.246250867843628″/>
<m:Pushpin Location=”-27.469442,153.030136″/>
</m:Map>

6. Refresh the designer in visual studio by clicking the link and then build your project.

7. Hey Presto! – you should now be seeing a bing map just like the one above showing the locations of the ID offices.





Getting started with Silverlight 3 and SharePoint

12 11 2009

Silverlight Logo Recently I have been focusing on creating some Silverlight charts using the ‘Silverlight Toolkit’ from Codeplex (see the link in the instructions below).

Once I had created my first chart I wondered how to get it to display in SharePoint. It seems there are a number of options for displaying a Silverlight application (xap) in a SharePoint web part.

I found lots of blog posts that described separate bits of configuring I needed to do to get Silverlight working happily in SharePoint. I’ve decided to create a getting started list of what you need to do to get Silverlight installed and how to display your xap file with the built in ‘Content Editor Web Part’. I have linked to other blog posts where necessary.

Configuration

1. Download and install the Silverlight 3 runtime from silverlight.net –

http://silverlight.net/getstarted/silverlight3/

2. Download and install the Silverlight 3 SDK and tools for Visual Studio from the silverlight site – 

http://silverlight.net/getstarted/

3. <Optional> Download and install the Silverlight Toolkit (If you want to use some of these cool and free Silverlight controls) –

http://silverlight.codeplex.com/Release/ProjectReleases.aspx?ReleaseId=30514

4. If you are running Windows Server 2008 you can skip this step as the MIME types should have been automatically added to IIS7 for you. For server 2003 users you will need to add the Silverlight MIME types to IIS6, follow the instructions here –

http://blogs.technet.com/jorke/archive/2007/09/11/silverlight-mime-types-in-iis6.aspx

5. This step involves configuring the web.config files for the SharePoint sites that you wish to run your Silverlight applications in. Follow the instructions on this blog post –

http://blogs.msdn.com/steve_fox/archive/2009/03/11/amending-the-web-config-file-to-support-silverlight-development-on-sharepoint.aspx

6. Ensure that the assembly System.Web.Silverlight is in the global assembly cache. If not then you can find it at the following location –

C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Silverlight\v3.0\Libraries\Server

7. Configuration complete! – now read on to the deployment section

Deployment

To get your silverlight xap displaying on a SharePoint page follow the steps below. In terms of where to store your .xap file there are a number of places for you to choose. Some people recommend storing it in a folder called ‘ClientBin’ in the IIS virtual directory of the SharePoint web application but I was not able to get this working. I opted for the simplest method which was to store the file in a document library.

1. Upload your Silverlight xap file to a document library

2. Switch to edit mode for your SharePoint page and add a Content Editor Web Part

3. Insert the following HTML code – 

<!–<div width=”600px” height=”100px” id=”silverlightControlHost”>
<object data=”data:application/x-silverlight”, type=”application/x-silverlight-2″ width=”450″ height=”450″>
<param name=”source” value=”
http://yoursite/sites/charting/XAPs/SimpleSilverlightChart.xap”/>
<param name=”onerror” value=”onSilverlightError” />
<param name=”background” value=”white” />
<a href=”
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=108182″ style=”text-decoration: none;”>
<img src=”
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink?LinkID=108101″ alt=”Get Microsoft Silverlight” style=”border-style: none”/>
</a>
</object>
<iframe style=’visibility:hidden;height:0;width:0;border:0px’></iframe>
</div> –>

Remember to remove the comments from the above code and replace the param value=”” with the url to your document library and xap file.

4. Click apply and save the changes to your content editor web part

5. If all went well you should be seeing your Silverlight application displaying correctly!

Note: You may need to play around with the width and height of both the <div> and <object> tags to size them correctly for your Silverlight application.

Good Luck! 🙂